Gabriel A. Wainer - Professor

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shared:extendedbio [2012/07/06 08:08]
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shared:extendedbio [2012/07/06 08:23] (current)
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====== Research ====== ====== Research ======
-His research at Carleton focuses on techniques for transforming simulation models into real-time systems. The  long-term goal is to reduce to a minimum the manual development of real-time software (a time consuming, error prone and expensive task), and the interfacing of these models with simulation software. These efforts have received support in approximately 1.5M$ from different funding agencies (NSERC, Precarn, CFI, OIT, CANARIE) and companies (IBM, HP, CMC, MDA, Intel). As a Co-PI Prof. Wainer participated in numerous research projects (with funding totaling over 30M$, from which approximately $1.1M have been directly spent for his  research). His students have always been successful in applying to numerous scholarships and awards, and they have obtained funding for their research in excess of 500K$. +Prof. Wainer started research in 1993, working in Real-Time (RT) Operating Systems (OS) and RT scheduling. With very limited resources and self-supervised, he was able to define new RT scheduling algorithms, and included these (and other RT techniques) in the first existing RT version of an open-source OS (RT-Minix). These results were published in various papers and a book. These ideas were used shortly after by other researchers in the field, leading to the development of the first versions of RT-Linux. Fifteen years after, my original approach continues to be used and cited, and new Real-Time Minix projects based on the concepts I defined almost 20 years ago have started in the last few years. 
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 +Since 1996, he contributed to the field of Modeling and Simulation (M&S), introducing Cell-DEVS, a new formalism that reduces the complexity of the development of models of physical systems while increasing the speed of the simulations. His team also defined new high-level languages and their mapping into DEVS and Cell-DEVS formal models (ranging from the traffic language ATLAS; Petri Nets, Timed Automata, Bond Graphs; up to a generic environment based on Modelica). This allows defining and interconnecting formal models that are discrete-event, spatial, continuous or hybrid. 
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 +His group  built CD++, an open-source tool implementing DEVS and Cell-DEVS. CD++ has been used to develop numerous models in different areas: ecology (watersheds, fire spread), biomedical (heart tissue, nerve terminal), physics (flow injection, heat transfer), engineering (wireless networks, robot path planning), construction, traffic, etc. These results have been made available in multiple articles, an open source repository and website for the community (which has over 300 users).  
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 +The team also introduced varied algorithms to run these models in multiprocessor and distributed architectures (using varied middleware and OS). The  simulation engines now provide the means to run distributed simulations using Web-Services, and high-performance parallel algorithms for Cell-DEVS. Users can develop and test models in local workstations, submit them to a remote parallel simulator, receive, visualize and analyze the results locally (using the advanced visualization tools we built).  
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 +Different RT simulation algorithms were defined for DEVS models since the year 2000. We used these techniques to build RT model prototypes embedded in different platforms, and a runtime executive integrating models within hardware surrogates. We have recently started experiments with multicore hardware, including a prototype version on Intel IXP 2400 boards, and Cell-DEVS models on IBM’s Cell BE architecture.  
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 +His research at Carleton has focused on techniques for transforming simulation models into real-time systems. The  long-term goal is to reduce to a minimum the manual development of real-time software (a time consuming, error prone and expensive task), and the interfacing of these models with simulation software. These efforts have received support in approximately 1.5M$ from different funding agencies (NSERC, Precarn, CFI, OIT, CANARIE) and companies (IBM, HP, CMC, MDA, Intel). As a Co-PI Prof. Wainer participated in numerous research projects (with funding totaling over 30M$, from which approximately $1.1M have been directly spent for his  research). His students have always been successful in applying to numerous scholarships and awards, and they have obtained funding for their research in excess of 500K$.
The results of his research are reflected in numerous publications:\\ The results of his research are reflected in numerous publications:\\
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He has  also been invited to be the External Examiner of 13 Ph.D. theses, and he has evaluated numerous projects in Europe, Canada and Latin America. He has  also been invited to be the External Examiner of 13 Ph.D. theses, and he has evaluated numerous projects in Europe, Canada and Latin America.
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